Staying Hydrated During Summer Heat

It is common knowledge that staying hydrated is an important component of lasting wellness, but many people don’t realize when their health symptoms are actually caused by dehydration. Taking simple steps to remain consistently hydrated this summer will help you prevent painful and bothersome health problems, especially in the unforgiving Florida heat.

Always Carry Water With You Read More

CoQ10: Often Overlooked in Cardiovascular Health

Coenzyme Q10, also known as CoQ10, has become one of the most popular dietary supplements in the United States, yet many medical professionals still overlook its importance in the maintenance of cardiovascular wellness.

What is CoQ10?

CoQ10 is a vitamin-like compound found throughout our bodies that plays a critical role in how we produce energy. Small amounts of CoQ10 are naturally found in some foods; however, most CoQ10 is synthesized by tissues in our body. As we age, our bodies produce less CoQ10, resulting in less efficient energy production. Studies have shown vast benefits with CoQ10 supplementation in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Read More

The benefits of Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinol) in Cardiovascular Disease

coq10Coenzyme Q10 was introduced to the United States market about twenty years ago. However, during the most recent years Ubiquinol has become one of the most popular dietary supplements. Before being introduced to the American market, Ubiquinol was used in Japan as a prescription drug to treat cardiovascular disease. Coenzyme Q10, is an endogenous synthesized and diet supplied lipid-soluble cofactor that functions to improve the production of energy and the antioxidant defense in every cell of the body.  Ubiquinol is important for those taking statins to reduce cholesterol levels, it’s also been found to lower the risk of a variety of chronic cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure. Read More

The Truth about Sugar and Cardiovascular Disease

sugarGetting too much added sugar in your diet could significantly increase your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. For many years high cholesterol was believed to be the number one cause of heart disease. Recent studies have shown that in fact added sugar in your diet significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to studies performed by JAMA, “those who got 17 to 21 percent of their calories from sugar had a 38 percent higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, compared to those who consumed eight percent of their calories from added sugar.” Read More

Heatstroke and Dehydration

dehydrationAre you staying hydrated this summer? Sweating less does not mean you are hydrated. You could be having a STROKE.

Many are surprised to learn that the first sign of a heatstroke is lack of sweat. Bodies stop producing sweat when the cooling system in your body lacks the ability to cool down. Anyone is susceptible to a heat stroke so it’s important to understand the warning signs. Heatstroke symptoms include: pale skin, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, high body temperature, racing heart and rapid breathing. The good news is that heatstroke is preventable. Read More

Will a Paleo Diet Help or Hurt Heart Health?

36454288 - various paleo diet products on wooden table

There are plenty of diets out there, from the Atkins to South Beach, so it can be tough to keep track of the requirements for each. The Paleo diet is a relatively new trend that has caught on like wildfire over the past few years. Whether you’ve adhered to a strict Paleo diet or you’re just exploring your options, it’s important to know whether living Paleo will improve your heart health.

An Overview of the Paleo Diet Read More

BUTTER is Not the Enemy

butterA nutrition study completed by the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts in Boston has declared butter a “neutral” food. It isn’t good for you, but it isn’t bad for you either.

Low-fat turkey meat, a bagel, cornflakes, margarine and soda are all worse for you than butter, according to the study authored by Dr Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

There is no link between consuming butter and an increased risk of heart disease or stroke, the study says. It actually found that butter might slightly help prevent Type 2 diabetes unlike the highly marketing fat free or reduced fat items sent our way.  Read More